Tax Over Sugary Drinks Would Reduce Annual Health Expenditure By USD 29 Million As Well As Reduce Obesity Cases: New Study

Tax Over Sugary Drinks Would Reduce Annual Health Expenditure By USD 29 Million As Well As Reduce Obesity Cases: New Study

Overview

  • Post By : Microbioz India
  • Source:
  • Date: 15 April, 2016

According to recent reports every two adults out of three in USA are suffering with high weight gain even children too and govt spends about estimated $190 billion a year in treatment of obesity disorders. High level consumption of sugar drinks in all age groups is become most important contributor of obesity related disorders.

In Australia about 20% tax over sugar drinks would have great benefits as reported by researchers of University of Queensland, Australia.

The tax over sugary drinks not only impact over reducing obesity disorder but also reduces an annual expenditure by $29 million and according to report this step highly affects young age groups having high level of consumption of sugary drinks.

"Our modeling scoped the effects over the lifetime of adult Australians alive in 2010," Dr Veerman said. "We found there would be 800 fewer new Type 2 diabetes cases each year once the tax was introduced. "After 25 years, about 1600 fewer deaths would occur each year, with heart disease accounting for the largest share of this postponed mortality," he said.

"There would be 4400 fewer people with heart disease at that time and 1100 fewer people living with the consequences of stroke.""In effect, Australians would enjoy about 170,000 healthy life years that they would not have otherwise."

According to reports University of Queensland working over this study with joint collaboration of World Health Organization and Victoria’s Obesity Policy Coalition. This important study recently appears ion PLOS with title: The Impact of a Tax on Sugar-Sweetened Beverages on Health and Health Care Costs: A Modelling Study. Note: the above story is for information purpose for more information go through original story source. Story source: University of Queensland

Journal references:

J. Lennert Veerman, Gary Sacks, Nicole Antonopoulos, Jane Martin. The Impact of a Tax on Sugar-Sweetened Beverages on Health and Health Care Costs: A Modelling Study. PLOS ONE, 2016; 11 (4): e0151460 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0151460

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