Russian Tuberculosis Are The Most Infectious: Scientists Provided Possible Explanation

Russian Tuberculosis Are The Most Infectious: Scientists Provided Possible Explanation

Overview

  • Post By : Microbioz India
  • Source: Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology
  • Date: 19 August, 2016

The researcher from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology provided possible clues over Mycobacterium tuberculosis epidemiology in the region of Russia and countries of the former Soviet Union after deep analysis that results tuberculosis is the most infection in concern region.

A paper detailing the results has been published in the journal Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group).Tuberculosis is a type of infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the disease is known to be an uncontrolled up until the 20th Century even the availability of a number of possible cures of disease at its early stages. There are 22 countries in the world; including Russia the rate of infection is high compared to other part of the world. There are various strains of bacteria causes tuberculosis out of which strains of Beijing family are common in Russia. (Type of strains discovered in Beijing) and infected up to 150,000 people.

For better understanding of disease causing strength of this strain researcher compared protein of strain of Beijing: B0/W148 with a control strain.

As the results researcher found that which and how many proteins, there were in each strain. It was found that in Beijing B0/W148 strains, 266 proteins were differentially abundant compared with the control strain. 57 of them were entirely absent in the study group and 17, on the contrary, were unique to it, others differed quantitatively.

Story source/Credit: Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Journal References:

Julia Bespyatykh, Egor Shitikov, Ivan Butenko, Ilya Altukhov, Dmitry Alexeev, Igor Mokrousov, Marine Dogonadze, Viacheslav Zhuravlev, Peter Yablonsky, Elena Ilina, Vadim Govorun.Proteome analysis of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing B0/W148 cluster. Scientific Reports, 2016; 6: 28985 DOI: 10.1038/srep28985

About Author