A Researcher Uncovered The Mystery Over The Presence Of Bacterial Colony In Infant Airways: May Help In Protection From Lung Disease

A Researcher Uncovered The Mystery Over The Presence Of Bacterial Colony In Infant Airways: May Help In Protection From Lung Disease

Overview

  • Post By : Microbioz India
  • Source: University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Date: 10 August, 2016

Researcher from University of Alabama at Birmingham presented an interesting research work which covers a mysterious thought over the presence of bacterial colony in the airways of newly born baby.

Till now it was well known thought that airways are sterile until after birth. Research suggests this is true that airway of infant is colonized with bacteria till 24 weeks gestation. However, this is unclear that how bacteria enter in airways. The concern research recently appears in Scientific Reports, one of the Nature Publishing Group journals. "We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease," the researchers say “Should a disordered airway microbiome prove to be involved in the pathogenesis of disease, it will be of immediate interest to attempt to develop novel therapeutic interventions." Researcher also suggests a pattern of colonization in the airways of infants may play a great role to developed type of quality neonatal drugs. "Right at birth, your respiratory microbiome can possibly predict your risk for BPD," said Charitharth Vivek Lal, M.D., assistant professor in the UAB Pediatrics Division of Neonatology and the lead investigator of this study.

Lal and colleagues wrote, "As it is commonly believed that colonization of neonates originates in the birth canal, we were surprised to find that the airway microbiome of vaginally delivered and caesarean section-delivered neonates were similar, which suggests that the microbial DNA in the airways is probably transplacentally derived, consistent with reports that the placenta has a rich microbial."

Story source/credit: University of Alabama at Birmingham

For more information:

Follow the story source

Journal References :Journal References: Charitharth Vivek Lal, Colm Travers, Zubair H. Aghai, Peter Eipers, Tamas Jilling, Brian Halloran, Waldemar A. Carlo, Jordan Keeley, Gabriel Rezonzew, Ranjit Kumar, Casey Morrow, Vineet Bhandari, Namasivayam Ambalavanan. The Airway Microbiome at Birth. Scientific Reports, 2016; 6: 31023 DOI: 10.1038/srep31023

About Author