Newly Researcher Trying Unlocking Mystery Over Cave Dwelling Fish To Live Healthy With Diabetes: Research Study

Newly Researcher Trying Unlocking Mystery Over Cave Dwelling Fish To Live Healthy With Diabetes: Research Study

Overview

  • Post By : Microbioz India
  • Source: Genetics Society of America
  • Date: 15 July, 2016

Cave fish another name is hypogean fish named because of adaptation of life to live in caves and now recently researcher trying to know how cave fish adapted themselves to live in extreme environmental conditions, this may help in future for better treatment and suggestions to live healthy with diabetes.

This statement presented at The Allied Genetics Conference (TAGC) 2016, a meeting hosted by the Genetics Society of America, and trying to resolve genetic mystery how cave fish adapted for extreme environmental conditions.

We found that cavefish have very high body fat levels, are very starvation resistant and have symptoms reminiscent of human diseases such as diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease," said lead author Nicolas Rohner, Ph.D., of the Stowers Institute for Medical Research. "However, the fish remain healthy and don't have any obvious health problems like we see in humans. Untangling the molecular mechanisms or genetics responsible for these adaptations could potentially lead to new insights into human diseases."

The researcher found that which one is very help full clue for diabetes is that Cave fish exhibit very high blood glucose levels just after eating and very low levels when food isn't available. This property is just similar to people with diabetic condition.

These swings in blood glucose are similar to those experienced by people with untreated type 2 diabetes,

"We think that like hibernating animals that acquire extra body fat in the fall to survive the winter, the cavefish become insulin resistant as part of their strategy to acquire high body fat levels," said Rohner. "Similarly they likely use higher body fat levels to be more starvation resistant during periods when food isn't available."

Story Source/Credit: Genetics Society of America

About Author